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Empty Nest Syndrome May 31, 2009

Posted by Lindy in Uncategorized.
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Saturday, May 30, 2009

First, an update on the number of babies. We had a most pleasant surprise about 3 days ago to discover there were two babies, not one.

Mama left the nest today for long periods of time. When she finally returned she perched on a branch about 5 feet from her babies no doubt trying to encourage them to leave the nest. Dad was there also but instead of trying to help with the babies he was trying to mate. Poor Mom – she had her claws  full trying  to homeschool  her children and deal with an amorous mate all at the same time. The babies spent the hot desert afternoon fluttering their wings wildly strengthing them for their first flight. Do baby birds fear that first solo flight?

Sunday morning, May 31, 2009

Baby Doves, May 2009

Baby Doves, May 2009

The babies are not in the nest. My heart is in my throat as I search the entire yard inside the fenced in area. I am worried that our dogs might have gotten them but there is no sign of the babies anywhere. No feathers floating about and no signs of struggle. Suddenly the parents appear, flying about in an agitated state. The babies have to be nearby, but where? I continue my search for a good 10 minutes. Finally I notice the parents on the ground on the outside of the fence. We have our own small Mesquite bosque (forest) in this area, perhaps the babies are in one of the trees? I crouch down low to the ground so I can see the parents and then I begin to carefully scan the trees. There they are – huge sigh of relief and big smile. They are safely perched together on a low branch of a Mesquite on the “safe” side of the fence well away from our dogs. Mom and Dad are standing watch nearby. Did the parents know they had to get their babies away from the dogs? Were they well aware of the danger? Of course, the  babies are not totally safe anywhere. As long as they are young and just learning to fly they are at their most vulnerable. Somehow I am able to accept that they might not survive the hostile desert environment. I find it far more difficult to accept the idea that they might not survive the equally hostile human/pet environment.

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Comments»

1. Helen Ginger - May 31, 2009

I love this ongoing tale of the birds. I don’t know if they fear the first attempt at flight. I’m guessing it’s like a child wanting to go down a slide. They want to do it and they don’t know fear. I’m not sure kids, birds or human, know fear until they get hurt.

Helen
Straight From Hel

2. Betty - May 31, 2009

Thanks for the update. I’m glad to know they are alright, and safe for the moment, anyhow.

3. turtlewoman - May 31, 2009

Hi Helen, Great question – does any living being know fear until they get hurt? I wonder if there are any “studies” on this subject?

Betty, thanks for keeping tabs on my blog. I appreciate it.

It is afternoon and the babies have left the safety of the Mesquite tree. I have not seen them since this morning. Mom and Dad were sitting on the nest around midday mating. We have quite a love nest going on right in our own backyard. 😀 There isn’t much left of the nest. Mom will have to rebuild it if she is going to lay more eggs. First, she needs to take a class in safe nest building. Perhaps she is a new Mom and just needs more experience?

4. Scribhneoir - June 8, 2009

Thanks for the wee tale about the birdies, I really enjoyed it and the great pics. Good to know that the wee ones didn’t become snacks!

5. white o'morn cottage - July 19, 2009

What a truly beautiful photo. Thanks for sharing it. Love Pam

6. Lindy - July 19, 2009

Hi Pam, Thank you for your comment about that photo. That poor mama dove is now on her 3rd – or is it 4th – set of eggs since spring. She needs to learn to tell her mate “No” 😀 That first set of babies from my photo survived and flew away. We have not been so lucky with subsequent sets. She is nest sitting again as I write. My husband is considering moving her nest to a safer spot as our dogs lie in wait right underneath the nest just waiting for an egg or a new baby to fall out.

Lindy

7. Carol Mattingly - September 14, 2009

I have a Pentax K1000 totally manual camera and shoot slide film on it. I use a 270 or a 320 zoom lens and a Manfrotto tripod.

Most waterfalls and landscapes are used with this camera.

The closeups are from my Fujifilm 10 mp camera with 15 mm zoom lens. It also shoots macro and super macro.

Thanks for the compliment on my photos. I’m glad you like them and I hope you’ll visit often.
Carol


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